Saturday, 28 September 2013

The tail end of September in the garden

It's all looking a bit scrappy out there now.


This is a small space that's going to be a wildlife area.  There's the start of a logpile and lots of overgrown grass, which I think may be harbouring frogs.  No doubt there are lots of slugs in there as well.  Hopefully the frogs will eat the slugs.  Whilst I strongly believe that wildlife is a wonderful thing, I'm not in a hurry to stick my hands into that grass the see exactly what's lurking in there.  I have small boys for that.  Why have a dog and bark yourself.

Some of the strawberry leaves are turning this sensational shade of red.


Last year my eldest cut the leaves of off his strawberries in autumn, as recommended by Monty Don, and they were really neat and clean for ages afterwards.  So when I have a moment (!) I'll try and get round and do it again this year.  Or maybe he'll do it for me.  Sounds unlikely now I've said it out loud though.

Bob (Flowerdew) says that you also have to nip off all unripe figs at this time of year.  So being a slave to all that Bob says, I did.  Watch the sap though.  I got some on my arm and it did really irritate for a while.  And it's devilish sticky.


Unfortunately these little figlets are only good for the compost heap.

Elsewhere... there's still a little cricket.


Apples, almost ready.



Pears, still really hard.  Should I be ripening them indoors?  I've no idea, it's the first year I've had more than two!


The odd mushroom, being enjoyed by some unidentified wildlife.  It's almost all gone now.  Must have been delicious.


Tomatoes, ripening very slowly now.  They will soon be finished, ripe or not.


The pepper plants have been composted now.  I wasn't much impressed with them this year.  The flesh is very thin and the fruits were fairly sparse.  I honestly don't think I'll bother again.  Although you may have to remind me I said that in February when I look through the seed box and find a packet or two of leftover seeds.


In the pond there are some lovely fat beetles.  If they see you coming, they dive.  Apologies for the poor photo, it was quite gloomy and I didn't make a very good job of it.


Also a late waterlily.


In the kitchen there are still a few things from the allotment


I'm thinking borscht, salsa, lentil and vegetable soup, cucumber salad and something involving courgettes.  They hold no fear for me any more.  Production has slowed to three or four a week.  I can deal with that in my sleep.

And a final gift from the allotment - pink roses.  Last year I had hardly anything planted there, and I was mainly just tackling weeds.  But there were roses, almost until November which seemed like such a luxury, and a little reward for the effort put in.  There's an old rose bush by the shed, and it's hit it's stride now, after an early flush, and there are lots of beautiful buds.



In amongst the decay of autumn, a little last loveliness.  Enjoy the rest of the weekend all.

19 comments:

  1. You must have such a lovely garden. I'm impressed with all of your edibles, especially the figs! I would love to grow some myself but I have no idea how they would do in this climate. I should research that. I can't wait to hear more about the wildlife area, that is such a nice idea. The roses are beautiful, what a special treat to have them on your allotment. My roses keep blooming late too; last year, I clipped my last one on November 10, and I'm hoping they'll hold out that long this year too.

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  2. Generally you do pick pears hard and let them soften off the tree, We have picked all ours now. We have also picked most of the apples just some russets left on the plot.

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  3. I thought that if you left any small figs on the tree over winter they would produce an early crop next year. I do realise that Bob's an expert in these matters and probably knows best. I might leave mine on and see what happens by next spring as a sort of experiment.

    I've picked all our pears to ripen off the trees. Don't know if it's the best advice but the wasps soon start to damage our pears if they're left on the tree - or the pears fall of and are badly bruised.

    Those apples look really good just ready to eat.

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    1. No-o-o-o! Too late now, they are all composting. I picked the pears yesterday. As I was looking at the tree, four fell off all in a row. So now they are safely inside.

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  4. A lovely post, CJ! I also denude my strawberries at the end of the season and my tomatoes are at the same stage as yours, with a few ripening each week (perfect!). I've had a couple in the banana bowl and they've ripened up nicely. My Braeburn apples are almost ripe for picking, something I'm really looking forward to! I'm wondering how old your pear tree is? I've had a couple for about 5 years and not a whiff of fruit! Same story with the Victoria plums .... but there's always next year!

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  5. Oooh Whirlygig Beetles!! We love them in our little pond. CJ your Rose is stunning. I am in the process of researching roses for my garden. I would like a couple of bush roses and a climber. I love the colour of yours. Stunning.

    My plum tree gave me three plums this year....

    Leanne xx

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    1. I'm glad you reminded me what the beetles are called. I'll be interested to see what roses you come up with. I've got a Madame Alfred Carriere, which is a white climbing rose. It's only small at the moment, but I have big hopes for it! I think I ended up with eight plums from my little tree!

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  6. Don't go rummaging in the grass by the the log pile, it should be left undisturbed.
    I hope that the apples and pears taste as good as they look. I'm still picking a few tomatoes, much to my surprise. Lovely roses. Flighty xx

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    1. I shall not disturb. Thanks Flighty.

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  7. Those strawberry leaves are such a beautiful color! xoxo

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  8. You're still bringing lovely harvests home from the allotment, even this late in the season. What a shame your figs didn't ripen, you'd have had a great harvest there. My peppers have done really well this year but they take up so much room that I'm not going to bother next year either.

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  9. Aargh! Fig sap! I had a run-in with a fig a few years ago and I swear I still have the scars to prove it. I love the idea of rewarding yourself with late season roses... they are a very pretty shade of pink.

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    1. Ooh, that sounds nasty. I found the problem was scrubbing the stuff off after it had started irritating my skin. It sticks like the devil.

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  10. What an absolutely perfect pink those roses are! A similarly gorgeous rose bush in next doors garden is leaning across our 6ft fence, I keep wondering if they'll notice if I pinch a bloom or two!

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  11. Lovely to see so much produce from the allotment still and beautiful roses too. I have never heard of cutting the old leaves off the strawberry plants, I will give that a go.
    Sarah x

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  12. So good to see the courgettes slowing down, isn't it ? ;o) Gorgeous roses btw !

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    1. It is, it is. It was overwhelming there for a while!

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  13. What a treat to be able to pick such a beautiful posy of roses at the end of September. I'm amazed at how much produce your allotment is still giving you. You must be a very good gardener indeed! x

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    1. Thanks Gillian. I think there's a large element of luck involved though!

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