Sunday, 30 August 2015

Let's not bother with the allotment...


















I don't have any photos of the August allotment, owing to dodgy weather and a lack of visits for anything other than a quick harvest of beans and things.  So I have city pictures instead from a little trot round we forced the children into having.

The bronze figure is John Cabot, who came to Bristol over 500 years ago, back when it was the second largest seaport in England.  He set sail across the Atlantic in 1497 on a ship called the Matthew and reached land in North America, maybe in Newfoundland, or Labrador, Canada or maybe Maine.  You can see a picture of the replica Matthew here.  It lives in Bristol docks now, and you can have a look round and even a little trip on it.  It's really not very big, and Cabot took just 18 men with him.  I can't imagine what it must have felt like to just set sail into the big unknown like that.

As usual the summer holidays have flown by.  I have a ridiculous amount to fit into the last few days.  Not least a hundred name tapes waiting to be sewn on.  But what's really occupying my thoughts at the moment is calligraphy.  I've always wanted to try it, and I'm wondering if I can fit such a thing into my life.  I can't of course.  But I can't stop thinking about it.  The eldest bought a little calligraphy set on holiday, maybe I shall sneak his pen out and have a bit of a go when he's not looking.

On the subject of hobbies, do any of you understand the whole concept of fishing?  The middle boy is desperate to have a go.  He's devoured book after book about it and knows all about lines and floats and gudgeons and rudd.  I thought he would be bringing home fish for tea, so I made some comment about having to gut and clean them.  But apparently once you've caught them you just put them back.  As a vegetarian I'm all for this of course, but it does beg the question why bother.  Fishing is huge in this country, so I'm obviously missing something here.  If you have any enlightenment to share, I'd love to hear.

34 comments:

  1. Fishing is a huge hobby here too and I really don't get the "catch and release" thing. On the other hand, I don't understand hunting down an animal so you can put its head on your wall either. :-(

    I eat meat. I understand that the animal must die for me to have dinner, but I'm totally against hurting/killing an animal just for the sport of it. (Okay.....off my soapbox.)

    It does seem that most boys go through a phase of wanting to fish. My son begged for a fishing rod one year when he was about 10. I think he went a few times, but the allure wore off when he realized Mom was not going to remove the slimy fish from his hook for him.

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  2. P.S. I forgot the most important part of my post. Your photos are GORGEOUS!!!

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  3. is that what Bristol looks like? wow! I never went there when I as in the UK many years ago because I was given the impression there was nothing to look at - but that is so wonderful. HOW DO councils keep those big flowering hanging pots looking so beautiful?
    when you put it like that, catch and release sounds very absurd.

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  4. If we catch a fish here we usually eat it. I don't get the catch and release thing, either. Now.. my dear.. you must start learning calligraphy now. May I suggest you get your own pen and nib and bottle of ink.. and a pad of nice paper asap? I wish I could teach you myself, I've taught several classes on calligraphy. The biggest thing to learn is you hold the pen nib at a 45 degree angle while you write. If you want me to send you a pen, let me know. You will love it and you can make your own cards and things the rest of your life. ((hugs)), Teresa :-)

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  5. Your photos are beautiful, eye catching. Have a go with the calligraphy, you won't know until you try.

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  6. As a veggie I don't like the whole fishing thing either but the sitting by a river for a few hours with a flask and some sandwiches is something I could definitely get behind! As for calligraphy, I'd love to be able to do it (my handwriting is appalling). My friend always writes with a calligraphy pen and hers is gorgeous, so I'd definitely have a sneaky go if I were you. Great photos; I really like Bristol. xx

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  7. Those balconies are very beautiful... I've never visited Bristol but it looks lovely. Liverpool has a great maritime history too and cities by the water are always so interesting.
    Calligraphy: give it a go. I did once, and I enjoyed it. It doesn't need masses of time or equipment and your library probably has a few books worth borrowing.
    Fishing? Definitely a boy thing (like girls and ponies). At least it's time spent outdoors I suppose...
    Have a lovely bank holiday Monday.
    S x

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  8. For a moment there, I thought you'd pitched up in New Orleans! Those balconies are gorgeous. Interesting concept having a 'help yourself' garden in a city centre - was there much still to pick or had people denuded the garden of produce? It's a lovely idea, I'd love to know how it's managed. Re fishing: I was obsessed by fishing when I was 8, I remember the excitement of catching fish (and, yes, I put them back) but I particularly loved just sitting on the pier by myself, a moment of solitude and daydreaming. To put this in context, my family lived opposite the beach on Key West island at the bottom of the Florida Keys ... So I was safe and sitting by crystal seas in hot sunshine. I think the British experience of river fishing may be a little different!

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    1. Thanks for your reply, CJ (I wasn't sure you'd get this msg if I hit reply to your email) - and thanks for the link to the article in the local paper. I did wonder if the edible bed was part of Sara Venn's work for Incredible Edible Bristol as I know she's been working hard on that project. I guess it will take people a while to cotton on to the idea of helping themselves to a taste of whatever's growing. A bit like those flower bouquets that people would leave around (can't remember what that was called now!) More power to their elbow, I say! x

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  9. Lovely photos of Bristol. I wonder if fishing is more for the peace and quiet of sitting on a river bank with a rod and line than about the actual fish caught. I always worry that the poor fish even though not dead might have jolly painful mouths after having been hooked! My friend is coming to visit from West Wales next week as her husband will be joining his mates for some sea fishing at Weymouth so as far as I am concerned some good does come out of it!!

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  10. I'd definitely sneak a go with the calligraphy set! sounds fun!

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  11. Hmm, fishing. Absolutely no idea!!!!!!!! I can see the point of catching and eating them if you like to eat fish, but otherwise......... Bit like playing football and then stopping just before you score a goal????? Perhaps it is just me! Great to see around Bristol a bit with you. I hope you get to spend more time at the allotment in September. xx

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  12. Lovely pictures. I've not been to the plot much either. Calligraphy is certainly a fascinating subject. I've never been into fishing so I'm as unenlightened as you are. Have a good week. Flighty xx

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  13. Lovely photos of Bristol. It is a place full of history. Can't throw any light on the fishing thing! It always seems a bit pointless. Calligraphy though - younger daughter has been having a go and has done some lovely posters. There's lots of inspiration on Pinterest.

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  15. Lovely photos. I've always been a bit of a fishing widow when we go on holiday, all three of them go fishing but they rarely go at home. I'm actually quite glad that they put the fish back once they've caught them, I couldn't do with gutting them.

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  16. I pressed delete! Sorry! I'll retype the gist- have been fly fishing which is an art in itself but not really my thing. We used to take the kids when they were younger to a stocked lake where they caught and released the fish. F was the only one who really took to it (his grand father is a fly fisherman) so he goes every now a then. xx

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  17. I fished once. I got wet, I smelled like fish and I even got a fish hook stuck in my forearm. That was the last time I ever tried it. I think this all looks like more fun than the allotment, as much as I love your allotment posts and wish I also had an allotment. I wish I had all of this other stuff too. :)

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  18. You should definitely sneak his pen and try your hand at calligraphy! I think you'd be wonderful at it. I've often thought of it, but my normal handwriting leaves a bit to be desired so I'm not sure how I'd fare. With everything being typed out on a computer, it's really nice to think of sending a note in lovely handwriting:) The photos of your walk around town are beautiful--it always amazes me the history in your part of the world. Things are considered old here if they're 100 years old, but I'm sure those cathedrals date back even further. Hope you're having a great start to your week, CJ!

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  19. Hey CJ,
    Just catching up here. I am without a computer again. We fish off the rocks at Clodgy, and always throw the fish back. I'm not achuge fan of fish unless it comes wrapped in batter with lots of salt and vinegar. I enjoy it though, and so do the boys. Plot n.10 has been a disaster. Even Olly's carrots turned into Cosmos.
    Leanne xx

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  20. The 'kids' fish, but at trout farms and in the sea, they're fishing for food not fun, so it makes more sense.

    Loving the Bristol pics, and as ever that I immediately recognise so many of the places photographed. You can take the girl out of the West Country but you can't take the West Country out of the girl!

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  21. Oh I love when you "take us out" with the family. Your photos are always so lovely and I feel like I have gotten a visit in too. My mother loves to fish on land, my father prefers to fish on a boat. The fishing bug never really caught on to me. I think I'm much too impatient for it. But we are eating fisher people. I have a very hard time understanding catch and release. I think it's all about the doo-dads and crafting lures etc.

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  22. I don't get fishing either. I prefer to eat sanitised fish fingers, they don't stare at me. I would quite like to be forced to wander around Bristol! I do like the free fresh food photos very much! On the topic of name tapes: I have given up sewing them in, I bought sticker ones that seem to be permanently fused to the fabric. Have a lovely week. x

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  23. Mackerel fishing off the rocks is fun, but only if you grill/barbecue and eat them straight away and never more than one fish per person. We've seen people land buckets full. What do they do with them? Freeze them I suppose, but I'm not a fan of eating frozen produce unless it's ice cream, bolognese or raspberries to cook with over the winter. Bristol has such an interesting history, good for you for exploring it with the boys. I'm a bit disillusioned with my allotment too. All that drought and then the rain and finally the wind - not good. I used to fold name tapes in half and just anchor them with a couple of stitches. Much quicker than sewing all the way round. Good luck,with it all, I'm sure we'll all feel better about our allotments when we've got more time.

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  24. I've never really understood fishing although used to go with my Dad when I was little... Many years ago!

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  25. This weekend we had a debate about fishing. I have learnt that it is about the quiet, the time to think and a space of your own. Sometimes it is about catching a fish, but that is not essential. The only people I know that fish are men. They tend to do it on a weekend as it keeps them out of the way....... Nobody ate the fish they happened to catch, they were thrown back.
    I didn't get fishing before but now I am concluding that for some people it's not a sport, it is a legitimate means of escape parcelled as a hobby!

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  26. Fishing is greaty fun. I have fished for years. I gave up for a while due to small offspring but my wife paid for me to have a flyfishing lesson and I was hooked again. The great think about fly fishing is that there is no nasty and very smelly bait...just nice clean flies!

    What ever typer of fishing you do takes just enough concentration so that you cannot think about anything else. Its a very good way to relax. And if you are fishing you cannot be getting up to mischief...

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  27. Perfect photo's ! Sorry the allotments all been a bit of a wash out this year :-( No, don't get fishing either, but hey, ho - not sure there's many men that get crochet ! have a great week K xx

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  28. Let's not bother with the allotment....


    I love that line!

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  29. Oh, god, John loves fishing. Not that he gets to go much, but still. He also throws them back. The main thing is that it's incredibly relaxing, he says. Sitting in damp clothes, awkwardly, while holding a big wobbly stick in the water, for hours. Yes that must be ever so relaxing...

    Great photos though, especially that top one. xx

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  30. I love seeing pictures of your allotment but also love seeing Bristol too especially as my ancestors lived here and also my son is there too! The Matthew visited Weymouth after it was first built and I have also seen it in Bristol, it looks so small especially moored close to SS Great Britain!
    My husband and daughter fish they seem to be spend lots of time not catching anything. You can put fish back as long as you haven't damaged them by hooking them. I hate seeing them kill the fish and rarely eat anything they catch. Sarah x

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  31. I can't see the attraction of fishing but my Dad used to love it. I'm glad I don't have to do the name tape thing any more - my youngest still lost several jumpers despite my efforts; even worse was having to embroider their initials in their house colours onto their PE shirts - now that was a challenge and mine looked like they'd been stitched by a 6-year old. Love your Bristol pics you've been posting, I haven't been to Bristol and now I want to go there. Enjoy the rest of the week xx

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  32. Oh my dear I could write a book on fishing it's Mikes very favourite hobby. Your son must have been course fishing in which you have to put the fish back however should he do some river or sea fishing then you can keep your catch & eat it. Mike favours course fishing in the summers & sea fishing in the winter. As exciting as sea fishing sounds it's normally off a pier! Pah name tags I've given up with just having the one child in high school now, my fingers are very thankful x

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  33. I"m not sure what motivates most people who fish, but for my grandfather it was the peace and quiet and contemplative nature of it that had appeal. I can remember him lighting up his pipe, throwing in the fishing line, and sitting for hours on the banks of a nearby stream.

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